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A Life of Bliss

Life of Bliss is the story of shy young bachelor David Bliss as he lives the sweet single life. Produced in the United Kingdom, George Cole plays the lead character David Bliss. Famed bird imitator, Percy Edwards, filled the role of Psyche the dog. The show was written to be a light-hearted and simple comedy, but the response was strong and the show became a hit around the world. Life of Bliss later became a popular television program.

Bold Venture

Salty seadog Slate Shannon (Bogart) owns a Cuban hotel sheltering an assortment of treasure hunters, revolutionaries and other shady characters. With his sidekick and ward, the sultry Sailor Duval (Bacall), tagging along, he encounters modern-day pirates and other tough situations while navigating the waters around Havana

Escape

The famous opening to the show, often worded to suit the events of the moment or season, warns the intrepid radio listener of adventure that is anything but... everyday. Like its sister show on the radio, Suspense, it is considered one of the top shows ever done on radio. Escape takes you on a ride into a world where danger comes in many forms, and you are on the edge of life and death, and perhaps you are being pushed! When Escape says romantic, we're not talking kissing, perhaps those kisses might be from teeming piranha! Escape is more Devil's Island than Fantasy Island. And it is wonderful adventure radio for the whole family, especially Dad.

Father Knows Best

The series began August 25, 1949, on NBC Radio. Set in the Midwest, it starred Robert Young as the General Insurance agent Jim Anderson. His wife Margaret was first portrayed by June Whitley and later by Jean Vander Pyl. The Anderson children were Betty (Rhoda Williams), Bud (Ted Donaldson), and Kathy (Norma Jean Nillson). Others in the cast were Eleanor Audley, Herb Vigran and Sam Edwards. Sponsored through most of its run by General Foods, the series was heard Thursday evenings on NBC until March 25, 1954.

Fort Laramie

Fort Laramie was a radio Western series that aired Sunday afternoons at 5:30pm(et) on CBS from January 22 to October 28, 1956. Produced and directed by Norman Macdonnell, this Western drama depicted life at old Fort Laramie during the 19th Century. The 41 episodes starred Raymond Burr as Lee Quince, captain of the cavalry. One year later, Burr became a television star as Perry Mason. Supporting regulars included Vic Perrin as Sgt. Gorse, Harry Bartell as the slightly green Lt. Seiberts and Jack Moyles as Major Daggett. Heard on a more irregular basis were Howard McNear as Pliny the fort sutler, Sam Edwards as Trooper Harrison, and in a variety of roles, such actors as John Dehner, John McIntire, Virginia Gregg, James Nusser, Parley Baer and Barney Phillips. Amerigo Marino supplied the music. The scripts were mostly written by John Meston, Kathleen Hite, Les Crutchfield and John Dunkel. [edit]

Frontier Gentleman

Frontier Gentleman tells the adventures of an English newspaperman who is sent to document life on the American Frontier. Interestingly, newspaperman Kendall, played by John Dehner, interacts with a number of historical characters, including Calamity Jane, Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickok, Sitting Bull and General George Custer.

Frontier Town

Chad Remington's quest to bring his father's killer to justice served as a springboard for a career as a crimefighting attorney in the small town of Dos Rios. Remington was played initially by Jeff Chandler, billed as Tex Chandler. Halfway through the program's run, the role was assumed by Reed Hadley. Remington's sidekick, Cherokee O'Bannon, was played by Wade Crosby using the speech patterns of W.C. Fields. The series was written and directed by Paul Franklin. Ivan Ditmars and Bob Mitchell provided the background organ music.

Gunsmoke

Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. The stories take place in and around Dodge City, Kansas, during the settlement of the American West.

Have Gun Will Travel

The Have Gun Will Travel radio show broadcast 106 episodes on CBS between November 23, 1958, and November 22, 1960. It was one of the last radio dramas featuring continuing characters and the only significant American radio adaptation of a television series. John Dehner (a regular on the radio series version of Gunsmoke) played Paladin, and Ben Wright usually (but not always) played Hey Boy. Virginia Gregg played the role of Miss Wong, Hey Boy's girlfriend, before the television series began featuring the character of Hey Girl. Unlike the small-screen version, in this medium, there was usually a tag scene back at the Carlton at both the beginning and the end of the episode.

Hopalong Cassidy

The Mutual Broadcasting System began broadcasting a radio version of Hopalong Cassidy, with Andy Clyde (later George McMichael on Walter Brennan's ABC sitcom The Real McCoys) as the sidekick, in January 1950; at the end of September, the show moved to CBS Radio, where it ran until 1952

Meet Corliss Archer

Meet Corliss Archer, a program from radio's Golden Age, ran from January 7, 1943 to September 30, 1956. Although it was CBS's answer to NBC's popular A Date with Judy, it was also broadcast by NBC in 1948 as a summer replacement for The Bob Hope Show. From October 3, 1952 to June 26, 1953, it aired on ABC, finally returning to CBS. Despite the program's long run, less than 24 episodes are known to exist.

Our Miss Brooks

Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast on CBS from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (195256), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name.

Philip Marlowe

Philip Marlowe was like many hardboiled detectives at the time, he could take a punch to the face and still have a stinging comeback. He was also morally upright, liked classical music and played chess. In all, there were 7 Philip Marlowe novels published all of which have been adapted to film or radio.

Six Shooter

Britt Ponsett was a laid-back cowboy drifter who found himself in all kinds of situations from comical to dangerous. Stewart was the perfect choice for the title character alternately portraying the character's easy attitude and the stress of the tense situations with the emotion in his voice.

Tales of the Texas Rangers

Tales of the Texas Rangers, a western adventure old-time radio drama, premiered on July 8, 1950, on the US NBC radio network and remained on the air through September 14, 1952. Movie star Joel McCrea starred as Texas Ranger Jayce Pearson, who used the latest scientific techniques to identify the criminals and his faithful horse, Charcoal, to track them down. The shows were reenactments of actual Texas Ranger cases.

The Chase

Genres vary on The Chase, from adventure to crime to science fiction, but each show is consistently exciting and always contains a chase scene. This show is very well done, partly because it is directed by Fred Weihe, who is known for directing X Minus One.

The Mysterious Traveler

The Mysterious Traveler was an anthology radio series, a magazine and a comic book. All three featured stories which ran the gamut from fantasy and science fiction to straight crime dramas of mystery and suspense.

Yours Truly Johnny Dollar

Each story started with a phone call from an insurance executive, calling on Johnny to investigate an unusual claim. Each story required Johnny to travel to some distant locale, usually within the United States but sometimes abroad, where he was almost always threatened with personal danger in the course of his investigations.